Tag Archives: lesson planning

Teaching Regular Expressions / regexp in lessons

RegExp are great fun if you’re an Abstract Mathematician, or mildly masochistic. For the rest of us, it’s silly to work on them without using something like this: https://regex101.com/ When we teach regexps, are we aiming for students to: Become experts in typing? Have 20/20 eyesight? Be non-dyslexic – dyslexia is for failures, who’ll never

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“Choose a shape to draw”: example #python code for simple input (y7/y8) with graphics

Aimed at Years 7 and 8, when giving them interesting/fun things to work on without them knowing/understanding all the background concepts. i.e. this assumes you work on a “teach Y7-8 basics and SOME principles, then re-teach / add the other principles in more detail to Y9-Y11 when they move into GCSE-level work” plan. Here we

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“draw Forest”: Example #python lesson/code for why functions/procedures are useful

Again, I was looking for something to include in my lesson that would show the value of procedures [1] in a way that the students would care about. I wrote this, and set it up as a demo at start of lesson as they came in. PS: note the faked perspective effect. If you have

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Teachers won’t pay, but how can we support software we love? e.g. @Socrative

I like Socrative. As a teacher, I love it – and largely because it’s free, and requires no account-creation by students. But that blocks me from supporting it in the most important way: by giving the owners some cash. Not that it matters for Socrative any more – they sold the company for $5 million

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2 of 3: Lesson where locked computers worked for students benefit #edtech

Back to my class… In part 1, I admitted that I’d locked students’ computers for more than half a lesson. I stated that I felt this was a good thing, despite my pre-teaching revulsion and horror at such actions. This week, I used CC in LOCKDOWN for more than half a lesson …why? How? On

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Ideas for Y7-Y9 coding lessons from Usborne books

Last week, Usborne made their 1980’s books on computer-programming available free for anyone to download (PDFs here – click on the book covers over on the right hand side). The “Computer Games Listings” books are particularly interesting; is there any use in them for teaching Computing today? Listings The listings are surprisingly hard to invent:

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Work-scrutiny in Computing lessons; Exercise-book reviewing; showing pupil progress #edtech

A handful of things I’m experimeting with / have used / seen used for low-effort rapid recording during lessons: iPads used as cameras. Because they’re so big, you can hold at hip-height and be taking photos while looking at a child / talking to a group, and still be composing images out of the corner

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Lesson idea: Digital Literacy, use Google to choose a java library

Today I needed to modify a small Java program to accept command-line parameters. Java’s built-in support for this is so bare as to be non-existent: it clones C’s “no library, no help, go away” implementation. This makes an excellent problem for testing / practising using Google to find something: It’s a very well-known problem, has

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A* classroom apps: Architecture of Radio

[Context: We don’t want Apps in the classroom, we want exceptional apps, that transform our lessons.] Architecture of Radio In one sentence: walk around the school visualizing in 3D all the radio waves that intersect and overlap around you. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/architecture-of-radio/id1035160239?mt=8 Transformative? Radio (electromagnetic) waves are invisible, but are core to the Science curricula. They are

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