Tag Archives: algorithm design

Why use #python when teaching #coding in school?

Much (most?) of the literature is gloriously one-sided and IMHO deceptive in pretending that Python is good at many things it sucks at. This doesn’t help those teachers trying to make a fair and balanced decision. Overall, I believe that if you learn programming primarily via Python you’ll be a weaker programmer than if you

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“draw Forest”: Example #python lesson/code for why functions/procedures are useful

Again, I was looking for something to include in my lesson that would show the value of procedures [1] in a way that the students would care about. I wrote this, and set it up as a demo at start of lesson as they came in. PS: note the faked perspective effect. If you have

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Auto-convert Python source to AQA Pseudocode

As has been remarked widely: if your “pseudocode” has a syntax, it’s probably a programming languge, not Pseudocode. And, as it happens, AQA’s pseudocode can indeed be programmed with. Here’s half of the proof: a 1-to-1 conversion from Python to AQA: https://github.com/gbaman/Python-To-AQA-Pseudocode Useful for writing correct practice questions and homework examples for students! Write it

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A* classroom apps: Architecture of Radio

[Context: We don’t want Apps in the classroom, we want exceptional apps, that transform our lessons.] Architecture of Radio In one sentence: walk around the school visualizing in 3D all the radio waves that intersect and overlap around you. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/architecture-of-radio/id1035160239?mt=8 Transformative? Radio (electromagnetic) waves are invisible, but are core to the Science curricula. They are

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How dare schools and governments routinely lie through their teeth about school performance?

I was reading Robert Coe’s 2013 talk today, got a little way in, and was reminded of my love/hate relationship with statistics, and especially their use in Public Office / Government / Education / etc. It has always seemed to me that stats are bused left, right, and center, and despite some exceptional scrutiny (e.g.

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